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Language Analysis (BA, UF)

Content
This lecture provides an overview of concepts and terminology used in grammatical analysis and demonstrates how these are applied in the analysis of syntactic structures and texts. In this way, this course provides an important foundation for both language classes and linguistics courses.

Aims

  • To identify and name the individual parts of syntactic structures (using standard terminology)
  • To talk informedly about key grammatical categories and explain their use in a given context
  • To recognise and rectify common errors
  • To make independent and judicious use of reference books


A detailed overview of the lecture content is given in the Language Analysis Handout (available from Copy Studio, Schwarzpanierstr. 11)

Integrated Language and Study Skills: ILSS 1 & 2 (BA, UF)

Content
These courses focus on independent study skills, vocabulary development, grammar of selected areas (in connection with text-based work). Students will work on text comprehension (reading, listening, summarizing and synthesizing of information), analysis of the structure and development of descriptive, expository and argumentative texts, and the production of well-organised and stylistically appropriate texts.

Aims

  • To develop writing skills in order to produce the coherent, cohesive and focused texts required in an academic and professional environment
  • To be able to express an opinion and support it with evidence.
  • To develop high-level reading skills in order to cope with a range of academic texts.
  • To encourage students to develop independent study habits (with regard to grammar, usage and vocabulary)

Methods
Communicative language practice, developing skills and strategies for understanding and producing texts.

Assessment
Attendance, class participation, regular homework assignments and two written tests on material covered. Students are expected to keep a vocabulary log and possibly give an oral presentation in class.

Toolkit
Students are advised to invest in books which will assist their learning. Various dictionaries and handbooks necessary for English studies in general will be recommended by lecturers (Toolkit).

ILSS 2 includes a Common Final Test at the end of the semester.

Language in Use 1 & 2 (BA, UF)

Content
In these courses students work with and analyse a wide range of text types, literary and non-literary. They develop an awareness of how texts are used (to inform, to explain, to persuade, to convince, to move to action, to delight or any combination of these) and learn how to identify characteristic features of different text types and explain their effects. These insights will have a positive impact on students' own production of spoken and written text.

Aims

  • To raise awareness of the importance of lexical, grammatical and stylistic choices in text
  • To develop functional discourse competence and awareness of audience and purpose
  • To develop increased awareness of register and appropriateness
  • To deepen and refine insights into the language system and lexis

Methods
Communicative language practice, analysis of spoken and written texts.

Assessment
Attendance, class participation, regular homework assignments and one written test. Students are expected to continue their Vocabulary Log from ILSS.

Literature
Students will continue to use the reference books suggested on the Toolkit handout from ILSS I and II.

 

Practical Phonetics and Oral Communication Skills: PPOCS 1 & 2 (BA, UF)

PPOCS 1

Content
Building on the knowledge in phonetics and phonology acquired in the Introduction to the Study of Language 1 lecture, this course further elaborates the main aspects of English pronunciation at both the segmental and suprasegmental level, and provides ample opportunity for practice. There are courses taking either American or British English as their teaching models. It is recommended that students choose the accent they feel corresponds most closely to their English or the accent they can identify with most.

Aims
•    To improve students’ pronunciation
•    To improve students oral presentation and reading skills
•    To improve students’ communication skills
•    To reinforce students’ theoretical background in practical phonetics (including transcription)

Methods
Communicative language practice based on the discussion of theoretical concepts, presentations

PPOCS 1 comprises a compulsory two-hour Language Lab session each week, for which students must register separately.

PPOCS 2

Content
Building on the skills and knowledge acquired in PPOCS1, this course focuses on interactive speaking skills and formal presentations. It discusses characteristic features of spoken language and provides ample opportunity for practice. Students will continue to work on their pronunciation and will learn to make effective use of intonation, voice, turn-taking devices and lexico-grammatical means to interact successfully in conversation and discussion. Depending on the lecturer the course will have a mainly American or British English focus and students are advised to choose according to their own preferences.

Methods
Communicative language practice based on the discussion of theoretical concepts, presentations

Aims

  •   to speak fluently and effectively in various forms of interaction and production
  • to have expert knowledge of the characteristics of spoken language
  • to have practical analytical skills for monitoring own speech and that of others

Assessment
Assessment is based on an in-class presentation, class participation, assignments/portfolio, and a final oral exam, which involves a presentation and spoken interaction

English in a Professional Context: EPCO (BA, UF)

Content
This course equips students with some of the skills required to cope with professional genres and gives examples of the use of English in at least two professional domains (one of them being Economics/Business Administration). Students identify key text types and their functions, as well as characteristic features of such texts. They also become aware of how they can apply this knowledge in a professional setting.

Aims

  • To develop the skills necessary to adapt to and acquire a wide range of new genres
  • To develop awareness of the parameters that shape professional genres and how these parameters affect linguistic encoding and text structure
  • To cope productively and receptively with highly specialised text types and help experts to communicate these texts to various audiences
  • To develop an understanding of effective communication in professional settings


In this course students are required to submit their ELLA Portfolio [hyperlink], which is part of the overall course assessment.

English in a Professional Context (EPCO - Advanced) (MA)

Content
This course aims to equip students with the skills and knowledge necessary for coping with highly specialised texts from different professional domains. The focus is on independent genre analysis and adapting texts to make them suit different target audiences and purposes

Aims

  • To develop the skills necessary to adapt to and acquire a wide range of new genres
  • To make students aware of the parameters that shape professional genres and how these parameters affect linguistic encoding and text structure
  • To cope productively and receptively with highly specialised text types
  • Ultimately, to communicate effectively in professional settings


Methods
Communicative language practice based on the discussion of concepts from genre analysis

Assessment
Assessment is based on regular assignments, class participation, independent student work, and final test

English for Academic Purposes - EAP (UF, MA)

Content
As part of the MA programme students are required to plan and undertake research leading towards an MA thesis. This course is designed to support students in this process, building on knowledge they have gained from previous language classes and their experience of writing academic papers. The course addresses the following three core issues:
- Students’ identity as writers and readers of academic texts
- Academic genre conventions
- Textual competence

Aims

  • To develop students’ use of English in an academic environment
  • To promote students’ capacity to present research findings in an appropriate form
  • To enable students to reflect critically on their own work and that of others


Method
Interactive classwork, independent study

Assessment
Assignments, class participation

Reading
Core texts will be provided in a reader which will be available at the beginning of the semester.
Recommended further reading:

  • Clark, Romy; Ivanic, Roz. 1997. The politics of writing. London, New York: Routledge.
  • Swales, John M.; Feak, Christine B. 2000. English in today’s research world. A writing guide. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press.
  • Swales, John, M.; Feak, Christine B. 2004. Academic writing for graduate students (2nd edition). Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press.
Institut für Anglistik und Amerikanistik /
Department of English
Universität Wien
Campus d. Universität Wien
Spitalgasse 2-4/Hof 8.3
1090 Wien
Austria

T: +43-1-4277-424 01
F: +43-1-4277-9424
Universität Wien | Universitätsring 1 | 1010 Wien | T +43-1-4277-0